Author Archives for My Real Dish

About My Real Dish

Sue Ellen is a mother, Spanish teacher, Young Living essential oil user, world traveler, and follows a strict wheat, dairy, and egg free diet loaded with veggies. So if you have food sensitivities and you are wondering what you can eat, here on this blog she will share not only recipes, but also her dish on health, essential oils, and life. Get ready to make some yummy foods and DIY essential oil products!

French Toast (Gluten-Free & Vegan)

After using chickpea brine for a vegan meringue, I had the idea to use it to make a gluten-free french toast! Guess what?! It worked! I have missed French Toast, but not anymore!

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French Toast (vegan & gluten-free)

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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A classic French Toast with flavors of cinnamon, and vanilla, but with a vegan twist and gluten-free bread!

Tip: (1) You can substitute gluten-free bread with a gluten-free vegan baguette sliced, I personally like Schar (they are reasonably priced on Vitacost, try your local grocery store or Amazon). (2) Top with vegan whipped cream (if desired) and warm maple syrup.

Credit: My Real Dish

Ingredients

  • Chickpea brine drained from a 15.5 oz can of chickpeas
  • 2.5 Schar gluten-free baguettes or 10 slices gluten-free vegan toast
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2/3 cup dairy-free milk (I used almond)
  • 1 tablespoon monk fruit sweetener (you can also use sugar, coconut sugar, or xylitol)
  • Butter or coconut oil to grease the pan.


Directions

  1. Drain chickpea brine from the can and refrigerate remaining chickpeas to make pasta, soup, or salads, etc.
  2. Mix the chickpea brine, cinnamon, vanilla extract, sweetener, and dairy-free milk together in a bowl.
  3. Melt vegan butter or coconut oil in a skillet set to medium-high heat. I have used this skillet here with regular toast-sized bread and with coconut oil. I have also used my Zyliss pan for the mini-baguette slices and greased the pan with melted vegan butter. Both work well, depends on your choices.
  4. Dunk each slice of bread in chickpea mixture, soaking both sides.
  5. Place bread on the pan and cook until they are golden brown, then flip. If you remove too early, they will be mushy. You want them to almost caramelize in the butter or coconut oil.
  6. Serve warm with warm maple-syrup and dairy-free whipped cream.

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Eggplant Tomato Zucchini Mushroom Bake

Fall is here! I’ve been loving this vegan, gluten-free oven roasted vegetable dish so much that I just bought three jars of this Wildtree Bruschetta Blend. I am constantly in need of easy and tasty dishes, that I can serve in many ways so that I can eat them for a couple of nights for dinner without getting bored. I’m a busy momma! I have served this dish over gluten-free noodles, served over rice, eaten as a side dish, and even served as an appetizer bruschetta style on top of a vegan gluten-free baguette. It is so versatile!

One Sunday evening, as I was meal prepping for the week, I pre-made the veggies in the pan and let them marinate overnight. I was amazed at how good the veggies were when they had time to soak in all the herbs and spices! I have also let them marinate after work before going to the gym for a couple of hours and I enjoyed the extra burst of flavor the marinating provides. However, if you are the wait-until-the-last-minute mom like I am, then don’t worry, you can just quickly chop and bake.

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Eggplant Tomato Zucchini Mushroom Bake

  • Servings: 10
  • Difficulty: easy
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Oven-roasted savory herbaceous veggies steal the show in this low-carb meal. Serve it alone, as a side dish, over rice or gluten-free noodles as a main dish, or over a sliced gluten-free baguette as a bruschetta-style appetizer. Features the Bruschetta Blend by Wildtree.

Tip: (1) My favorite gluten-free vegan baguette is Schar (they are reasonably priced on Vitacost or try your local grocery store). (2) If you do not have Wildtree Bruschetta Blend I have tried this when I was out of the spice blend: 1 tablespoon dried basil, 1 teaspoon dried parsley, 1/2 teaspoon organic garlic salt, 1/2 teaspoon organic dried onion, and 30 twists of pepper instead of 11. (3) Marinate overnight for maximum flavor. (4) You can substitute zucchini with a yellow summer squash.

Credit: My Real Dish

Ingredients

  • 3 portobellos
  • 1 medium eggplant
  • 1 zucchini (or yellow squash)
  • 1 large sweet onion
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 1 cup sliced cherry tomatoes
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup balsamic
  • 1 tablespoon garlic
  • 1 teaspoon real salt
  • 11 grinds of peppercorn medley grinder
  • 2 tablespoons Bruschetta Blend from Wildtree


Directions

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Chop vegetables
  3. Add ingredients to a large baking pan, and stir to coat vegetables with sauce and spices.
  4. Cook for 40 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir every 15 minutes while cooking.

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Homemade Guacamole

One of my favorite foods, if not my absolute favorite, is avocado. Today I’m sharing with you this delectable guacamole by Sid Ali. His dishes are Paleo and healthy, and his photography is absolutely stunning. For us food bloggers, he also offers tips to make our photos stand-out, and you will definitely walk away with something new to ponder and try. I’m honored to be able to feature his dish with you, and I know that you won’t be able to put down your tortilla chips; it’s also fabulous on a slice of gluten-free toast! Make sure you’re hungry before you visit his site because he will make you want to eat!

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Homemade Guacamole (Vegan & Paleo)

  • Difficulty: easy
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Simple, delicious, Paleo, and Vegan homemade guacamoles perfect on toast or served with tortilla chips.

Tips: add red bell peppers and green bell peppers or poblanos for less spice, jalapeños for medium spice, and cayenne and serrano peppers for a very spicy option.

Credit: Sid’s Paleo Blog

Ingredients

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 red onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 chillis
  • 1 lime
  • 30g fresh coriander (5/8 cup, 1.1 oz fresh cilantro)
  • extra virgin olive oil


Directions

  1. Roughly chop red pepper, red onion, garlic, chillis, and coriander. (Save 1/4 of the chopped red pepper for later).
  2. Destone avocado and add flesh to the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Add a squeeze of lime juice (to taste) and a splash of extra virgin olive oil.
  4. Blitz in a hand blender for just a few seconds or until you reach your desired consistency.
  5. Add the remaining chopped pepper for garnish.

Don’t forget to visit Sid’s Blog for more great recipes and gorgeous food photography !

Warming Vegan Recipes To Eat This Week

If you are a recent addition to the vegan world, you might have found the vegan lifestyle and food habits easy during the summer months with fresh salads and pasta dishes, but when the weather turns and we face colder nights you may miss an easy crockpot roast or warming stew. The good thing is that you can still enjoy vegan and healthy comfort foods! 

Vegan Curry

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For something warming that hits the spot, nothing can be better in fall than a good old curry. Now that ‘going vegan’ is becoming popular in the world there are loads of curry recipes which are vegan by nature and this makes it much easier for you to find a great spicy dish to enjoy. In previous posts, I shared a Creamy Curried Broccoli and Cauliflower Soup and Hearty Vegetable Lentil Stew with Goda Masala, but here is an additional yummy vegan curry recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can chickpeas (15.5 oz) 
  • ½ cup red lentils
  • 1 onion
  • 1 green chili
  • 1.8 oz (50g) chopped ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp Garam masala
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 13.5 oz (400 ml) passata
  • 3.38 oz (100ml) coconut milk
  • Rice to serve

Start off by pulsing the onion, garlic, ginger and chili in a food processor. Place into a pan and fry for 10 minutes until fragrant. Add all other ingredients and simmer for 40 minutes. Serve with rice!

Tomato Soup

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Tomato soup is a classic comfort food and it’s one which absolutely anyone can enjoy. The fresh, warming flavor is perfect after a cold day and this recipe is simple and delicious. I prefer mine served with a vegan grilled ‘cheese’ gluten-free sandwich.

Ingredients:

  • 5 medium (500g large) tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 handful basil
  • 16.5 oz (500ml) vegetable stock.

To start off, score a cross into the top of each tomato and boil them for a few minutes in a pan. Place directly until a bowl of ice cold water and allow the skin to peel off. Sauté onions and garlic until translucent, add all other ingredients and simmer for 1 hour. Blend until smooth.

Butternut Squash Risotto

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For a fall time classic which makes the most of the squashes we have available this season, a comforting bowl of risotto cannot go wrong.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (200g) butternut squash, diced and boiled
  • 1 cup (200g) arborio rice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 glass white wine
  • 25.36 oz (750ml) vegetable stock

Place some oil in a pan and add the garlic. Cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in rice and coat with the oil. Pour in the wine and stir until absorbed. Add the tomato purée and a ladle of stock. Stir until combined. Add cumin and some more stock. Repeat adding stock until all has been absorbed. Add in the butternut squash and cook for 10 minutes before serving with a crisp salad.

There are loads of tasty plant-based meals to enjoy as the weather cools so have fun with a few different recipes and you could end up with some new family favorites! What are your favorite fall favorite comfort foods?

Roasted Figs (Paleo & Vegan)

Figs have a short season so get to your nearest grocery now! I got mine at Trader Joe’s. I’ve been trying lots of new things with the Blonde Coconut Nectar since I used it to create my Blackberry and Blueberry Crisp. I love that its flavor doesn’t compete with the food and it doesn’t have a strong coconut taste either, just a nice sweetness. So I used it to roast the figs with a little cinnamon; sometimes the simplest ingredients are the tastiest.

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I’ve been enjoying them on oatmeal, on salad, pizza, and even a sweet potato with a little vegan butter. Just can’t get enough of these delectable figs! Plus, they are ready in a snap!

Roasted Figs (Vegan & Paleo)

  • Servings: 9
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Simple, delicious, Paleo, and Vegan Roasted Figs with only three ingredients. Check out the recipe ideas for ways to eat these figs!

Tips: Figs will stay fresh in the fridge for a week or so. I like to pull out a couple every day to add pizzazz to my typical staples.

Ingredients


Directions

  1. Heat oven to 375.
  2. Slice the figs in half.
  3. Place on a baking pan.
  4. Coat with coconut nectar and cinnamon.
  5. Arrange the figs cut side up.
  6. Cook for ~15 minutes until they are tender and slightly caramelized.
  7. Serve warm, and store leftovers with sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

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I participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. However, the product I am recommending in this post is one of my personal favorites that I frequently eat, make and enjoy.

Peach Upside-Down Cake (Vegan & Gluten-free)

Peach Upside-Down Cake

More Food Allergies

This recipe is for my son, who suffered a summer and spring of mystery hives this year; we discovered after 8 hours in an allergist’s office last month that he is so highly allergic to birch trees that he has developed a birch pollen-food syndrome. He can’t have fruit with seeds like peaches or apples if they are not baked, his peanut allergy is worse and he’s still allergic to eggs and dairy. Furthermore, his igA for gluten was a 93, so he has now joined the gluten-free club with his sister and me. I just sent this kid to kindergarten with a huge list of avoids and a new AUVI-Q®. On a positive note, they seem so much easier to use that epi-pens and they were FREE. Overall, he’s handling it all fine, with the exception of the gluten, but to cheer him up we baked this gluten-free vegan peach cake so that he can enjoy some of the yummy fresh peaches in season right now.

Easy Gluten-Free Recipe

I don’t remember ever eating a pineapple upside-down cake, but it was the inspiration for this peach upside-down cake. I have been playing around with peach pies the summer and still haven’t perfected my liquid ratio. So I decided to take the flavor of the spices that I loved and use them in a peach cake instead! This cake uses a gluten-free cake mix, I used Pamela’s. To make it vegan, I used applesauce 1/4 cup per egg. The cake consistency was perfect!

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Peach Upside-Down Cake (Vegan & Gluten-free)

  • Servings: 10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

An old-fashioned favorite with a twist of peaches, made easier with a simple gluten-free cake mix.

Tips: (1) Prepare gluten-free cake mix per box, substituting 1/4 cup applesauce per egg. (2) Serve with dairy-free vanilla ice cream or vegan whipped cream if desired.
Credit: My Real Dish

Ingredients

Peach Topping

  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 4 peaches
  • 2 tablespoons of maple syrup

Cake Batter

  • 1 bag Pamela’s Gluten-free Vanilla Cake Mix
  • 3/4 cup applesauce
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2/3 cup water
  • coconut oil to grease pan


Directions

  1. Heat oven to 325.
  2. Cut parchment paper for 9″ springform pan.
  3. Grease pan and parchment paper with coconut oil (I used cold-pressed unrefined) and a paper towel.
  4. Peel and slice peaches.
  5. Combine 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon allspice and maple syrup.
  6. Pour maple syrup spice mixture over peaches and evenly distribute sauce over peaches.
  7. Pour peaches into spring-form pan and set aside.
  8. Prepare gluten-free cake mix per directions of the mix, substituting 1/4 cup applesauce per egg.
  9. Pour cake batter on top of peaches.
  10. Bake for 38 – 45 minutes.
  11. Set aside to cool.
  12. When cool, quickly and gently flip the pan onto the cake stand and serve.

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Blackberry and Blueberry Crisp (Paleo, Vegan & Gluten-free)

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This pie only has 7 ingredients and takes less than 10 minutes to make!  See video below for the introduction of the recipe and the ingredients that I used.

Here’s how easy it is to make! Hope you enjoy!

Blackberry and Blueberry Crisp (Paleo, Vegan & Gluten-free)

  • Servings: 9
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

You will love the ease and deep rich slightly sweet flavor of this crisp. With only 7 ingredients, the natural flavor of the berries shines. It's thickened with tapioca flour to make it tree-nut free, gluten-free, and paleo. Serve with ice cream for dessert, or serve without for breakfast.

Tips: See the video for tips and the ingredients I used.
Credit: Loosely inspired by the Bakerita

Ingredients

Fruit Filling

  • 2 ½ cups blackberries
  • 2 ½ cups blueberries
  • 1 ½ teaspoon tapioca flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
  • ⅓ cup tablespoons coconut nectar (I used Organic Coconut Nectar by Blonde

Crumb Topping


Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease 9-inch pie pan with coconut oil
  3. Add blackberries, blueberries, tapioca flour, cinnamon, and coconut syrup, mix gently to combine. Add berries to the pie pan.
  4. In a small mixing bowl, add date sugar, tapioca flour, and coconut oil (1/4 cup at a time) and combine with a fork until combined.
  5. Spread crumb topping to the top of the berries.
  6. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes

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I participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. However, the products I am recommending in this post are my personal favorites that I frequently eat, make and enjoy.

Incredible Ways Going Vegan Will Change Your Health

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You might be right on the cusp of going vegan, or just trying to eat more healthily, and now you just need something to push you over the edge. You would be amazed and astounded at what incorporating a greater variety of fruits and vegetables into your diet can do for your body. Various research reports have highlighted the numerous advantages the plant-based lifestyle will bring. Here are some of the health benefits of eating more plants.

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Pic Source

Drop Those Pounds

It’s true to say that one of the main reasons many people find themselves turning towards the vegan lifestyle is to lose weight. That’s understandable because meat and dairy often means fat. So, it’s no surprise then that when you go vegan, you’re more likely to shed that excess weight. Observational studies show that vegetarians and vegans tend to be slimmer and have lower body mass indexes compared to other individuals.

If you want more evidence of this, just look at the research studies that compare those on a vegan diet to those on a calorie-reduced diet. The vegans in these studies were able to eat until they felt full and still lost more than those on the calorie reduced diet plans!

Vision

If you have had issues with your eyesight such as an astigmatism you may have needed to see an ophthalmologist. These individuals can help and will work to provide the best possible treatment which will usually involve glasses or surgery. However, if you improve your diet by getting more vitamins and minerals from a variety of different fruits and vegetables, you might find this change is enough to fix the issue. There are reports of people who have issues with their eyes which have disappeared after going vegan. So, if you hate your glasses and can’t stand contacts, it might be time to think about putting some more fruits and veggies on your plate!

Reducing Risks of Cancer

Did you know that eating seven portions of fresh fruit and vegetables per day will lower your chances of developing some types of cancers by nearly fifteen percent? According to research, people that follow a plant-based diet are more likely to match this requirement compared to others who fill their diet with junk food, meat, and dairy. All of which, coincidentally,  if consumed in high quantities, have been linked to cancer.

Reduced Pain

When people talk about following a plant-based diet, they often link it to the young generation trying this crazy diet fad. However, elderly individuals can experience the results of the vegan lifestyle as well. Arthritis is a condition that tends to develop as you age and can lead to immense levels of pain. Research studies have been looking at ways to reduce the pain experienced by individuals suffering from this condition. The study showed patients on the vegan diet experienced less pain and had more energy compared to the placebo group.

Regardless, following a plant-based diet or even just increasing the number of fruits and veggies you eat every day, does bring some fantastic health benefits for your body. If you have changed your eating habits to eat more healthy foods, what benefits have you seen?IMG_5329.JPG

 

Eggplant Chickpea Pasta (Vegan & Gluten-free)

This video describes tips and tricks and the ingredients that I used. If you have any questions, ask away in the comments!

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Eggplant Chickpea Pasta (Vegan & Gluten-free)

  • Servings: ~12
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

This easy light eggplant chickpea pasta dish has an olive oil sauce with fresh basil, parsley, garlic and tamari to bring out the flavors of the fresh garden vegetables. It's perfect for a summer or fall bbq or picnic, and is a complete meal.

Tips: If you have time, marinate your eggplant overnight with the tamari, shallot, basil, parsley, garlic, salt, and pepper. See the video for this tip!
Credit: My Real Dish

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon tamari (gluten-free soy sauce)
  • 1 teaspoon real salt
  • 3 ½ tablespoon chopped fresh basil
  • ½ cup parsley
  • 1 large shallot
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ cup olive oil (+ 3 tablespoons for sautéeing in the pan )
  • 12 grinds of the pepper grinder
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 3 small eggplants 
  • 2 heirloom tomatoes
  • ½ bag of gluten-free pasta (I used Trader Joe’s quinoa & rice spirals)
  • 1 – 15.5 oz can of chickpeas (garbanzos), rinsed and drained


Directions

  1. Prepare water to boil on the stove for the pasta with a little salt and olive oil. DO NOT overcook the pasta, it will make it mushy.
  2. Drain and rinse the chickpeas (I open the can almost all the way and leave a small portion attached, making it easy to rise and drain until the water runs clear or save the brine to make a vegan lemon meringue or key lime pie)
  3. Finely chop the eggplant, shallot, parsley, and basil, dice the bell pepper, mince the garlic, and chop the tomatoes in big chunks.
  4. Heat 3 tablespoons of oil on medium-high heat on the stove in a large sauté pan.
  5. Add eggplant, shallots, garlic, and bell pepper to the pan and sauté for 3 minutes.
  6. Add basil, parsley, black pepper, real salt, tomatoes and continue to sauté until the eggplant and onions are translucent and the peppers are slightly tender (if you haven’t marinated overnight).
  7. Combine with the cooked pasta and the 1/2 cup of olive oil, and serve!

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5 Benefits Of A Wholefoods, Plant-Based​ Lifestyle

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“Eat your veggies” my parents used to say, “it’ll help you grow up big and strong”. I choked down those veggies because my mom always overcooked them until they were MUSHY and she never salted or buttered anything! They were full of vitamins and minerals, I was told and while my infantile mind didn’t know how or why they were important, Mom and Dad told me that they were and this message was enforced after many nights staying at the table for hours because I refused to eat them and wasn’t allowed to leave until I complied. As an adult, I learned that if I don’t overcook my veggies and I actually season them – they really are delicious! I realize that my household was different than the majority of homes where most were told, “Eat your meat.” Regardless of what our parents told us, most of us were brought up to believe in a balanced diet. And better advice, our parents could not have imparted. A healthy mix of carbohydrates, proteins and healthy fats, along with a sprinkling of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients allow us to be the best that we can be…

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Image by PxHere

And then came the fad diets

For generations, a balanced diet was enough for us. But then came the fads. The latter half of the twentieth century and the twenty-first century gave rise to a whole host of fad diets. The Atkins Diet, the Dukan Diet, the Pritikin Diet, the zone diet and various soup diets, juice cleanses and formalized methods of formalized starvation found fame when they gained celebrity advocates and were used by Hollywood stars who needed to lose weight quickly to slim down for a role. These fad diets aimed to convince us that we’d been getting eating wrong our whole lives. They tried to make us believe that we’d dedicated our lives to an inefficient form of eating and that they alone held the keys to a healthier, happier, sexier version of us. They often demonized entire food groups (usually either fats or carbs), and bade us to eliminate them altogether from our diets. They promised quick and easy results and often they delivered. Cutting your caloric intake significantly and dropping an entire food group will often result in initial weight loss. But this inevitably leads to cravings and lapses and whatever gains are made are often lost just as quickly.

That may be because these fad diets fundamentally damaged the way we see food in a number of ways. They’ve made us demonize fats or carbs and value a slim body over a healthy body. Moreover, they’ve made us jaded and cynical. Thus, as more and more people turn to a plant-based diet (with this year’s veganuary seeing record numbers of people eschewing meat and animal products) it’s easy for us to dismiss it as just another fad. But a plant-based diet that eschews processed foods rich in animal products for whole foods, is much more than a fad diet. Here we’ll look at why a vegan or plant-based lifestyle differs from the fad diets of yesteryear before going into some of the health benefits…

A plant-based diet is still a balanced diet

First, I do want to say that the definition of plant-based has changed over time. It used to mean entirely vegan, but then moved to also incorporate vegetarian diets, and now includes few or no animal products. Regardless, the MAJORITY of your diet consists of vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, and fruits. A plant-based diet can still be perfectly balanced while fad diets advocate the omission of entire groups of macronutrients. There’s very little in an omnivorous diet that can’t be found in the plant world. “But what about protein?” you may be asking. Here’s the thing. All proteins come from plants. Only plants can take nitrogen from the atmosphere and convert it into the amino acids which are the building blocks of protein. When we eat a T-bone steak or a chicken breast, we’re simply recycling the plant-based proteins stored in their muscle tissue. A plant-based diet has all the complex carbohydrates, fiber, healthy fats and protein we need to live long and healthy lives. The only possible exception is vitamin B12. This is important in maintaining metabolic function and is found abundantly in eggs, meat, fish and dairy products but it’s harder to come by in the plant world. Mushrooms have some, but not enough to sustain us which is why a B12 supplement is advisable (I personally take SuperB from Young Living – you can buy it here and B12 spray from Dr. Mercola). But then most omnivores probably aren’t getting enough vitamin B12 either. Let’s look at some more benefits of embracing a whole food, plant-based diet…

Your risk of cancer is drastically reduced

History will remember our time as an era in which most of the population courted the risk of this dreadful disease. Modern cancer research has come an incredibly long way, with breakthroughs in gene editing meaning that a cure for this awful sickness could come within our lifetime… But until then, prevention remains the best cure. Those on a plant-based diet reduce their cancer risk in a number of ways. Plant-based diets are high in fiber and this has been directly linked to reduced risk of colon cancer. Unlike meat, eggs or dairy products, plants are rich in essential vitamins and minerals and contain phytonutrients which are essential for a healthy immune system and keeping serious illness at bay. It also means that they eschew processed red meats like bacon, salami, pastrami and pepperoni which have been labeled by the World Health organization as Type 1 carcinogens.

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Image by Pixabay

You spend less money on food

It’s a common fallacy that eating right is more expensive than subsisting on processed convenience foods than ready meals. In fact, in many cases the opposite is true. Fresh veggies, fruits, grains, and pulses tend to be far cheaper than meat, eggs, fish and dairy products and in most cases are less expensive than high calorie, low nutrient processed foods as well. This Time magazine article shows that vegetarians save around $750 a year more on food than meat eaters.

You vote for your wallet against animal suffering…

The primary motivator for many to cut animal products out of their diet (as well as their clothes, shoes and beauty products) is because they’re voting against normalized animal cruelty in the only way that matters in a capitalist society… With their wallets.

… And for sustainability

As our population grows, our animal agriculture industry is going to more and more environmentally damaging lengths to feed it. Raising animals for their meat, milk, and eggs utilizes far more land, water, and natural resources than growing plants. Animal agriculture is the world’s leading cause of species extinction, habitat loss, water pollution and ocean dead zones. In fact, 70% of soy grown on the planet is grown to feed livestock rather than humans. That should tell you everything you need to know about world hunger right there.

What can you do? This spring, I persuaded my husband to stop eating his daily turkey sandwich for lunch to a big delicious salad (it took his stomach a couple of weeks to adjust so please keep this in mind as you increase your veggies and decrease your meat). If I’m not home to make him a salad, he will prepare a bag salad kit, and I’m really proud of him! This switch must be attainable and easy friends! Try going plant-based, or simply reducing the plants : everything else ratio in your diet. You may be surprised at how much you benefit. If you would like a daily smoothie, salad or other plant-based recipe inspiration, follow me on Facebook or Instagram!

 

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